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HOME/REFERENCE/Repair FAQ

 

Toyota Celica Repair FAQ

The following document is reprint of the Toyota Celica Messageboard FAQ maintained by John. The most recent version of this FAQ can be found at http://home.istar.ca/~bigjohn/celica.html.

This page is intended as an information source on common common problems found in (primarily north american) Celicas. All information contained therin represents the credited authors and others opinions only. It is resulting from repeated questions and answers on the Celica Message Board. Any questions about the subject matter addressed in this FAQ should be directed to the messageboard board. Any disagreements with, or additions to this text should be directed directly to John at bigjohn@istar.ca

 

General Information
Engine

3S-GE
3S-GE/3S-FE
Cross-engine compatibility
Transmission
Brakes
Axles/Hubs
Suspension
Steering
Heater Control

 

 

General

  • Rust points.
    These are the areas prone to rust/rot on the 1986 to 1989 models.
    • Under radiator cross member, particularly at the LH side. As this provides an attachment point for the 'fore-and-aft' engine mount support, it can be critical if not repaired or prevented.
    • Rocker panels (Door sills) at rear end, just in front of rear wheel arch.
    • The cavity above, at the sides of the rear seat is also prone.
    • The cavities at the sides of the trunk (boot), behind the rear wheels, especially the inner vertical panel accessible from underneath the car.
    • The rear wheel arch edges.
    • The rear suspension towers. Although this rust is not generally structural due to the multiple layers of steel, it is messy, as water /dirt enters the trunk area.
    • Hood (bonnet) at front edge.
    • Bottom of windshield sides (windscreen), particularly on the LH side. This is normally covered by a black panel held by screws. It can lead to water entry.
    • Bottom of front fenders (wings) just behind the wheel arch. Dirt gets built up under the plastic splash panel. This can also lead to rust holes at the junction of the floor/firewall/rocker panel.
    • Front floor. There is a fore-and-aft bracing member in the centre of the floor area. It rusts from the inside.
    • Brake lines (pipes), particularly at the bend where the firewall meets the floor. These are covered with a perforated plastic panel that retains dirt.
    • Doors. Not too bad, but can rust at the bottom corners.
    • Sunroofs. Prone to surface rust that if not fixed, will end up perforated.
  • Clutch Pedal Squeaking (Taken from messageboard)
    I've had cars that do that squeaking pedal thing!!
    The pedals generally run on nylon type bearings. The push rod connection is nylon too. The prob is probably at the point where a return, or clutch pressure down spring is attached. I haven't looked at my Celica, this is general.
    As the spring pulls, the very end of it has to rotate against the attachment point, due to the changing angle. Also, a spring is very musically tuned, like a tuning fork, due to the hardness of the material. Due to the stresses around the adjacent area, it could be a VERY small movement of two nearby metal parts that are bolted together, not necessarily the actual moving parts. I would try oil rather than WD40. It is a far better lube, and applied with a squirt can,
    you can determine if you have hit the right spot by very local application. If that fails, then do the WD40 drench trick, after spreading newspapers below.
    Or, it could be the nylon bushings themselves built up inside with black dried grease crud. Or eaten through by wear. There might be a roller track under there, too. Or it could be the ball end that pushes inside of the actual cylinder, squeaking against the piston.
    Whichever way you look at it, this is a lay-on-your-back-with-flashlight-job!!

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ENGINE

  • General to all engine types.
    The cambelt should be changed regularly. If left too long, teeth detach from the belt. A suggested change period is every 100,000 miles at the most. A better idea is to replace at 60,000 mile periods.
    Connecting rod bearings have been known to 'spin', destroying the crank, and writing off the engine. Particularly # 1 cylinder rod bearing. It is a good idea to change these bearings at 100,000 mile periods or less. Certainly it is not advised to go more than 150,000 miles without changing them.
    Main bearings are seemingly never a problem. In most cases, when an engine has been dismantled, the mains have been found to be re-useable, despite mileages of 200,000 or more. Although they are at top limit size, and more oil pressure could be obtained by changing them.
    Cylinder bore wear is minimal. It is generally totally unecessary to rebore the engine block.
    Piston rings. These tend to wear at around mileages of over 150,000 miles. In rural areas, they may go 250,000 miles, with no appreciable oil burning occuring.
    Oil filters. The oil filters are mounted 'upside down'. This leads to oil drain back into the oil pan (sump) when parked. Only filters with an internal valve should be used. In any case, all engines , and particularly the 3SGE, which has slightly greater rod bearing clearances, are prone to a bearing rattle on start up from cold. With cheaper 'no valve' filters, this rattle will last longer in time than with the proper filter, as the oil pump has to refill the filter before supplying pressure to the bearings. This rattle is not a major cause for concern, but if the engine has higher mileage, may, if increasing over time, be an indication that the rod bearings should be replaced.
    Cooling System.
    The cooling system has been found to be adequate. Any problems are due to faults, either with the cooling system directly, or with the engine in some way that affects the cooling system.
    If overheating occurs in heavy snow, this is generally the build up of snow in the cavity between the radiator and the grille.
    Occasionally, posts have appeared on the messageboard complaining of coolant loss. The Celica is no different from other cars in this respect, if the head gasket is defective, it may pressurise the coolant system. Etc, Etc.
    To test for pressure leaks from the cylinders into the coolant system, before starting the car, first release then replace the rad cap, to ensure that there is no pressure or vacuum present in the system, then start the car from dead cold, and run for about 30 seconds. Then squeeze the top hose to detect pressure. Then release the cap, again to detect pressure. There should be none, as any pressure in a properly operating system should be from the heat and expansion of the coolant, and in this test, that heat is not present. This indicates that pressure is leaking from the cylinders into the cooling system.
    The good news here is that there have been no messageboard posts complaining of defective or cracked cylinder heads or engine blocks. The fault has always been the head gasket, or, in the case of high speed boiling over, the radiator being old and or plugged.
    After work has been done on a car, and the coolant refilled, it has been possible that there will be an air-lock in the cooling system. This can be removed by undoing a heater hose at the firewall connection, and running the engine on idle and bursts of revving, while allowing air to bleed out of the system. The symptoms of air-lock are that the engine will idle, then suddenly appear to boil dramatically. This action is due to the overheating of the higher parts of the engine, where there is no coolant in the system, then as the coolant at lower levels rises, it immediately boils, creating pressures more than the rad cap pressure rating.
    Testing for bad/plugged radiator. The car can be driven for many hours at lower speeds/loads, but once a certain speed is reached, or excessive hills encountered, it will slowly, over the space of a minute or so, rise in temperature gauge reading, then boil over.
    Testing the electric fan system. Let the car idle with the airconditioning off. At some point, the temperature will get high enough to activate the temperature switch that controls the fan. The fan should cycle, that is, turn itself off and on, as required by the engine. On models with aircon, there are two fans, and the control system for the second fan is not known. Be aware that once the car is moving at speeds over about 5 miles per hour, the fan should not generally come on. This may not apply in tropical climates.
  • Cooling System.
    The cooling system has been found to be adequate. Any problems are due to faults, either with the cooling system directly, or with the engine in some way that affects the cooling system.
    If overheating occurs in heavy snow, this is generally the build up of snow in the cavity between the radiator and the grille.
    Occasionally, posts have appeared on the messageboard complaining of coolant loss. The Celica is no different from other cars in this respect, if the head gasket is defective, it may pressurise the coolant system. Etc, Etc.
    To test for pressure leaks from the cylinders into the coolant system, before starting the car, first release then replace the rad cap, to ensure that there is no pressure or vacuum present in the system, then start the car from dead cold, and run for about 30 seconds. Then squeeze the top hose to detect pressure. Then release the cap, again to detect pressure. There should be none, as any pressure in a properly operating system should be from the heat and expansion of the coolant, and in this test, that heat is not present. This indicates that pressure is leaking from the cylinders into the cooling system.
    The good news here is that there have been no messageboard posts complaining of defective or cracked cylinder heads or engine blocks. The fault has always been the head gasket, or, in the case of high speed boiling over, the radiator being old and or plugged.
    After work has been done on a car, and the coolant refilled, it has been possible that there will be an air-lock in the cooling system. This can be removed by undoing a heater hose at the firewall connection, and running the engine on idle and bursts of revving, while allowing air to bleed out of the system. The symptoms of air-lock are that the engine will idle, then suddenly appear to boil dramatically. This action is due to the overheating of the higher parts of the engine, where there is no coolant in the system, then as the coolant at lower levels rises, it immediately boils, creating pressures more than the rad cap pressure rating.
    Testing for bad/plugged radiator. The car can be driven for many hours at lower speeds/loads, but once a certain speed is reached, or excessive hills encountered, it will slowly, over the space of a minute or so, rise in temperature gauge reading, then boil over.
    Testing the electric fan system. Let the car idle with the airconditioning off. At some point, the temperature will get high enough to activate the temperature switch that controls the fan. The fan should cycle, that is, turn itself off and on, as required by the engine. On models with aircon, there are two fans, and the control system for the second fan is not known. Be aware that once the car is moving at speeds over about 5 miles per hour, the fan should not generally come on. This may not apply in tropical climates.
  • Replacing Crank Bearings
    The bearings are dependent upon the crank being good. When run for extended mileages, the bearing shells wear down, and the tin based bearing surface disappears, leaving the copper that is lining the shell. If you carry on running, the steel will appear through the copper. When you have two similar metals as a bearing, the tendency is to'pick up' or gall.
    Typically, a used crank might have some ovality on the journals. This is more likely on the rod ends than the mains. Ya gotta get those new bearings in fast. If, when you strip the bearings out, you have any journals that have a dull finish, you might have a future prob. If so, try polishing them with super fine emery cloth, known as garnet paper. A really fine wet-and-dry bodywork paper would/might be OK, but you might have to 'kill' the surface by rubbing it over a steel edge of a piece of angle iron or similar - it has to be REAL fine. The goal is to have the journal totally
    'chrome'like in appearance. Less than that will be OK, but the judgement is hard to describe without showing it. If the journals are shiny but grooved/lined, leave them
    alone, do not try to polish. You should be ok with ovality up to about .001" on the rod journals - any more, it gets dodgy. The trick is to break the thing in like a baby. Try to keep the rpm down to about 3 or 4 grand max, and DO NOT ALLOW THE ENGINE TO LUG IN A HIGH GEAR. It is load that you are trying to keep down, not just revs. This will allow the bearings to wear to the shape of any crank journal imperfections/grooves. Go easy for the first 200 miles or so, and somewhat easy after that, for the next coupla hundred.

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  • 3SGE Problems/Repair. (and possibly other models)

    • Starter problem.
      The starter on this engine , as well as on the 2s, is mounted to the engine side of the bellhousing. On the 3sge, this places it under the exhaust manifold. There is a recurring fault. The symptom is that the engine will not start, not turn, and there will be no 'click' from under the hood. If the key is held in the start position, after a delay that varies, the starter may function. Eventually, after this delay is encountered, the problem will get worse, to the point where the car will never start. If the voltage of the supply from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid mounted on the side of the starter motor is checked, it will be 12 volts. Despite this, the solenoid will not 'pull in', to connect the main (thick wire) supply to the actual starter. A quick-fix to get the car started is to ensure that the car is in neutral gear, then jump a wire from the positive battery terminal to the supply wire (thin wire) that goes to the solenoid. This can be accessed at a single-wire black plastic connector that is just above the transmission. It is suspected, but not yet proven, that this fault may be caused by increased resistance at either the ignition switch, or the clutch safety switch. A 'lash-up' fix is to insert a relay, triggered by the original thin wire, that switches a supply that is taken directly from the pos. battery terminal, and supplies the solenoid side of the thin wire. There is a starter relay mounted under the dash, on the side, LH side. It is green in colour, and is marked on the case 'starter relay'. It can be removed by wobbling it fore and aft, which will free the plastic built-in retaining clips. It is energised from the ignition switch, and the ground to its primary coil is supplied through the clutch switch. So if it is clicking, the clutch switch should be OK. So, again, if it is clicking, and the starter mounted solenoid is not, it might be the relay contacts at fault. Even when the starter mounted solenoid is clicking, and the starter not turning, if this solenoid is temporarily supplied direct from the positive battery terminal, with the car in neutral, it will often get the starter to turn. There is some suggestion that if the battery is fully charged, this will fix the problem also, by allowing more amps to be available. Good (old fashioned lead type) battery clamps seem to improve things too. Another starter problem is a sticking solenoid or worn solenoid contacts. In this instance, when the key is turned, there will be a click under the hood, but the starter/engine will not turn. To fix this, the solenoid has a cover plate that can be removed. Clean all parts with electrical switch cleaner or similar evaporative cleaner such as TV tuner cleaner. DO NOT OIL THESE PARTS, as this will cause guk to build up and jam them. At the same time, the condition of the copper contacts can be seen. It is normally necessary to undo the exhaust from the manifold to take off the starter. Some bracing rods may also have to be removed.
      SUGGESTION FOR STARTER DIAGNOSIS.
      Check if solenoid clicks. If not, try feeding thin wire to starter with direct feed from positive battery terminal. If this turns the starter, try first cleaning out the starter solenoid. If this doesn't fix the prob, change the starter relay situated under the LH kick panel under the dash. It is labelled 'starter relay'. If that fails to fix it, try feeding the relay direct from the pos battery terminal. If it then turns OK, change the ignition switch.
    • Piston to valve clearance
      This has been roughly checked during a strip-down, and has been found to be very close. It is recommended that this be paid attention to if the head face is machined.
    • Piston Failure
      There have been a couple of instances of ring failure. The rings will typically be curved in , creating an overall diameter that is less than the cylinder bore size. Coupled with this will be disintegration of the piston ring 'lands', the part between the rings. This material will disappear completely, or just crack, so that chunks fall out upon disassembly. The reason for this has been discussed, and the only real conclusions are that attention must be paid to ring end gaps, perhaps going to a larger than recommended end gap (but not exceeding the wear limit). Oil breakdown is also suspected. In both known cases of this fault, the oil change periods had not been adhered to. In the example where substantial amounts of material had disappeared, there was also bearing damage, the bearings taking on the appearance of having been sandblasted. Larger flakes of aluminum were also found at the bottom of the oilpan (sump).
      This fault, although showing up as low compression using a compression tester, can give the appearance of being a bad valve. When oil is squirted into the bad cylinder, the compression may remain bad. This is probably due to the oil being immediately forced down past the ring area on the first stroke, due to the fact that the rings are effectively non-existent, as they have 'shrunk' into the bottom of the ring groove.
      There are two thicknesses of top ring, called by the supplier '1.2', & '1.5'. The 1.2 size seems to fit all 86 to 89 pistons. Perhaps the 1.5 size is for the Altrac (turbo) engine???
    • Building Engine for Racing
      The Haynes manual gives different bearing clearance figures for the 3SGE and the 3SFE, the 3SGE having slightly greater clearances. It would be wise to assemble the rods separate from the crank, torque rod bolts to spec., then mike the size of the bearing with an inside micrometer or similar bore gauge. The same with the main bearings, if new bearing are to be fitted. If the head is machined, either to increase compression, or as a repair to correct warpage, it would be wise to temporarily bolt the head to the block, and using modelling clay, check the valve to piston clearances. These can be increased in the home workshop by using an old valve as a cutter, by grinding saw teeth around the rim of the valve head, and driving it from outside the head using a power drill. This is a long process, but does work. A more speedy and practical option would be to give the pistons to the same machine shop as the cylinder head, and have the valve pockets machined to the same amount as is taken off the head.
    • Setting the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) on the 3S-GE

      From messageboard, contributed by Quyen.
      Quyen
      Adjusting TPS...
      Mon Apr 23 23:47:37 2001
      I am assuming that you're working on your car, 3SGE.
      1. loosen the two nuts on the TPS.
      2. Put a 0.6mm feeler gauge between the throttle stop and stop lever.
      3. Connect the ohmmeter to the bottom two terminals (IDL and E2).
      4. Turn the sensor clockwise until the ohmmeter's needle moves. Tighten up the two
      screws.
      5. Replace the 0.6mm gauge with a 0.5mm, there should be continuity between IDL
      and E2. Replace the 0.5mm gauge with a 0.7mm gauge, there should be no
      continuity.

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    3SGE & 3SFE

    • Wet Weather 'Missing'
      Engine misses or cuts out in wet weather, particularly after driving through deep puddles or slush.
      This is generally caused by water getting onto the distributor due to the underneath splash shields being left off. It can be partially fixed by jamming a plastic bag under the distributor. If the engine is hot, it is best to just wait a few minutes, to allow the heat to dry the distributor, before attempting to restart the engine.
    • Cylinder head differences.
      Although the block appears identical, the bolt pattern is definitely the same, the heads have a different configuration. In the 3SFE, the combustion chamber is partially in the piston crown, whereas in the 3SGE, the pistons are flat topped with valve reliefs, and the combustion chamber is totally in the head. This would prevent the fitting of a 3SGE (higher flowing) head onto a 3SFE block, without changing the pistons. The compression ratio would be too low to be satisfactory, and would counteract any gains in flow. It is not known if a compression increase in a 3SFE could be achieved by using 3SGE pistons. The resulting compression gain might be too high to run on readily obtainable fuels. The piston pin fitting is different, also.
      The cambelt crankshaft pulley tooth pitch has been checked and is the same on the 3SGE & 3SFE, but different on the 2s engine.
      The 3SFE and 3SGE crank/rods are different, despite the same stroke. The 3SGE piston pins are fully floating, whereas the 3SFE are press fit.
      The actual block on both engines appears to be identical, and therefore interchangeable.

     

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    ENGINE PART SWAPPING

    • 5SFE with 3SGE cylinder head.
      This has been much discussed on the messageboard, but no-one seems to have actually achieved it. The 5SFE is a larger capacity (by 200cc) version of the 3SFe, and is fitted to 1990 and onwards cars. The stroke is increased, and the bore is larger by 1mm, or about .040". The stock HP of the 5SFE is 135, same as the 3SGE. The theory is that as the 3SGE has 20HP more than the 3SFE, then if you take a 5SFE, which has the extra 20HP already by the increased capacity, then you will add at least another 20HP to the 5SFE, by adding the free-er flowing head from the 3SGE, giving at least 155HP. If stock 5SFE pistons were used, which have part of the combustion chamber in the crown, in the form of a recess, this would result in an estimated loss of compression ratio, amounting to about 0.5. If flat topped pistons were used, this would result in an increased compression ratio of about 1.0, which might be too high to run on regular/available gas. Nobody has ever supplied the specs for the stock 5SFE pistons, so it is not known if a 3SGE .040" oversize piston could be used. The piston pin height is not known. This mod would actually effectively be fitting a 5SFE block to a 3SGE, so the engine computer would have to come from a 3SGE, as would the intake system etc. All the control systems such as sensors etc are in the head.
    • 3SGE with 2S-E crank
      The 86 GT uses the 2s engine. This is 2 litre, but with a smaller bore, and longer stroke than the 3SGE or 3SFE. A crank has been tested in fit a 3SGE block, using 3SGE rods and pistons. The result was that the piston projected above the block deck by 1.5mm. The capacity gain would be only 88cc overall, and as the crank appears to be of weaker construction than the stock 3SGE, having lightening recesses at the sides of the crank pin areas, this project was abandoned due to lack of gain of power, and possible increased unreliability due to crank failure.
    • 2S-E with 3SGE head
      This may be possible. The head will no doubt physically fit. Valve clearances would have to be checked. The cambelt drive pulley has a different pitch on the teeth. It might be best to purchase a complete 3sGE if this is to be tried. In which case, it might be better to just fit a complete 3SGE, unless the purchased spare one has damage. Again, the crank strength might be a problem.

     

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TRANSMISSION

The automatic tends to be weak, although some opinions are that it is strong! Examples of weakness have been coupled with a failure to change fluid regularly. It is best to observe the regular changing of fluid, as it tends to lose lubricity, leading to total failure due to internal clutch wear.
The manual trans is quite rugged, but will generally suffer from bad synchro clutches, especially second gear, and sometimes fourth. The resulting crunching of gears leads to metal debris dropping to the bottom of the differential case, and this can damage or accelerate wear on the differential gears and bearings, leading to play in the output bearings, the 'opening' of the axle seals, and loss of fluid above the level of the axles. Although a concern, these transmissions have been driven for extended periods with only the fluid that remains at the bottom of the diff. casing, - presumably the splashing of the fluid is sufficient to lubricate the whole transmission. In such cases, however, the differential spider gears have been found to develop accelerated wear. The reverse gear tends to be weak, with a tendency when worn to pop out when power is applied, and total loss has been experienced. To avoid this, the reverse gear should not be 'crunched in' as the car rolls forward.
The manual transmissions appear to be identical in all the GTS models and the 86 GT. On the 87 to 89 GT models, and possibly all subsequent models, the transmission is different, because the starter faces the opposite way, towards the LH side of the car. This is presumably to accomodate the catalytic convertor, which in the later GT's is mounted integrally with the exhaust manifold, instead on in-line as part of the exhaust pipe.

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BRAKES
The disc brakes are very low maintenance items. On the GTS models, the rear brakes are also discs. On the GT, the rears are drums.
The only significant problem encountered has been the jamming of the calipers on the sliding components (rods). These rods are actually tubes that the mount bolts run through. This leads to uneven pad wear. The inner ( piston side) pad will normally wear at a slightly greater rate than the outer pad. When the sliders are jammed this wear difference is prominent.
A cure has been to free the sliding parts by oiling under the small rubber boots, then hammering the rod through, backwards and forwards, until it is free. If the small rubber boots are damaged, this tends not to be a major problem. Brake sliders have been known to jam irrespective of whether the boots are intact. After freeing the sliders, they should have an anti-seize compound applied. The sliders should be checked at each pad change, or once a yr.

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AXLES/HUBS
The 86 to 89 GT models have 4 stud hubs and 13" wheels. The GTS models have 5 stud hubs and 14" wheels. On these years, the axles cannot be interchanged, as the length is slightly different between the 4 & the 5 stud hub types. The outer cv joints are also different - although the hub spline is the same, the axle spline size where it fits into the cv centre race is larger on the GTS than on the GT.

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SUSPENSION
It is not known if the struts are identical on all models. The rear struts from the 86 & 87 GTS are different from the 88 & 89GTS. The difference is that the mount holes at the bottom of the strut are larger in the later models. The 86 & 87 GTS struts can be adapted to fit the 88 & 89 GTS by drilling out these holes , or carefully filing out with a round file after marking the hole edge. It is not known if this difference applies to GT models.
Also the sway bar link mount bracket is a very slightly different height on the 86 & 87 GTS compared with the 88 & 89 GTS.
The springs however are the same on all 86 to 89 FWD models, although the rear springs differ from the front.
A knocking noise over bumps that cannot be easily traced has been found to be caused by the sway bar body mount bushings.

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STEERING
The steering is normally power assisted rack & pinion. It gives little trouble. One fault that does occur, however, is the stiffening of the steering, giving symptoms of power assist failure. This is actually often found to be the universal joint that is mounted just under the brake master cylinder (LHD models). The cure is to drench this UJ with WD40, then light oil, while working the steering. It may take some time to free up completely. This same fault has been known to have a different symptom, namely that of the steering being 'lumpy' at random points as it turns. This is caused by the high angle that the UJ has to accomodate. It has a tendency to 'load up' pressure, then 'spring' overcentre of the stiff point. The clue to diagnosing this is the fact that the lumpy points on the steering wheel are at different places, but near to the same place (steering wheel position), each time encountered.

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HEATER CONTROL
The heater control often fails presumably due to age/wear. The slider that sets the heat from cold to hot fails, making it cold whatever the setting. When it starts to fail, it can be made to blow hot by working the slider back and forth. If this fails to work, the cable can be disconnected under the hood, and the tap (faucet) set to the hot position. This tap is located on the firewall, on the L.H. side of the car, just to the rear of the intake throttle unit. The cable is in fact piano wire, single strand. It can be levered free with a car key, so no tools are required for this 'quickfix' repair, which can be a real help in winter.
The actual driving of the cable is not direct. The slider controls the position of the tap by adjusting a variable resistance, which supplies electricity to a servo motor. In some cases, this fault can be fixed by applying electrical contact cleaner to 'track' on the inside of the control unit.
On aircon models, (and maybe all models) there is a flap that restricts the airflow. It has the bad habit when faulty, of closing during driving. It has a vertical shaft that is just level with the RH side of the radio console, with a crank level at the bottom, with a link to the electric servo motor, the motor being hidden at the firewall side of the heater box. This link can be disconnected, and the lever manually jammed into the hot setting. When this fault first occurs, and cold air starts, it sometimes works to switch the blower off and on again.

 

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All-Trac/GT-4 Information

  • FOUR WHEEL DRIVE TURBO ST 165 1988 MODEL
    This is a totally different car in many ways, and interchangeability with 2WD Celicas might for many parts be impossible. Info is hard to obtain. As of this date, March 2002, the writer has just purchased such a car, so this info will be updated from time to time as the car is worked on and info obtained.
  • 4WD DIAGNOSTIC CODE CHECKING.
    The procedure is the same, but the TE terminal may be labelled with a single T . The jumper is bridged across this terminal. and the E1 terminal.
  • RUST
    The rust seems to attack the same basic areas as a regular Celica, but the one I have has also got the rearmost rear differential subframe mounts completely separated from the subframe itself. The floors are rusted just like a regular Celica. The gas tank, being mounted behind the rear wheels, has perforated, as have all pipes to it.
  • REAR SUSPENSION BEARINGS
    On the 4WD models, the rear suspension is different than the regular 2WD car. The bottom links each go at the outboard end to a bearing (not a bushing) that is best described as a spherical bearing with tubular extensions on the center ball. This bearing is fiited into the hub housing casting. I am not sure if both links use the same part numbered bearing, but the forward link uses a bearing that is part number 42210 - 14010 . It should be noted that Toyota do not list an actual replacement bearing for this car - the whole hub housing assy casting has to be purchased. But I am told that this bearing (listed as for a 88 Camry 4WD) will fit.

 


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